Wimbledon reports £ 44million profit for 2021 championships despite very small crowd due to Covid

Wimbledon reports £ 44million profit for 2021 championships despite very small crowds and additional costs from Covid such as block booking of a central London hotel

  • Wimbledon got a financial boost this year after the 2020 event was canceled
  • The tournament had additional costs for Covid, such as a central London hotel block booking
  • UK gambling is already eagerly awaiting £ 30million government bonus











Wimbledon has seen an impressive financial rebound this summer, recording a championship surplus of £ 44million.

This despite a very small crowd, especially in the first week, before 100% capacity was restored in the two main exhibition courts from the quarter-finals.

The figures, released to members of the All England Club this month, suggest the Grand Slam turf court has weathered the pandemic so far without any lasting damage.

Wimbledon got a financial boost this year after the 2020 tournament was canceled

When canceled for 2020, the monetary coup was neutralized by a far-sighted insurance policy, although that has been impossible to guarantee this year.

Considering the drop in ticket sales and the additional Covid costs associated with the 2021 edition – such as a block booking of a hotel in central London – £ 44million is a good result, well than below the £ 50.8million announced in 2019.

The Lawn Tennis Association will receive the vast majority of the surplus. The British game is already eagerly awaiting a £ 30million bonus from the government, which is awarding the money to repair public courts across the country following Emma Raducanu’s triumph at the US Open.

Another sign of Wimbledon’s seemingly pandemic and recession-proof finances is that the recent No One Court bond sale has been oversubscribed.

A further 1,250 five-year ‘season tickets’ for the arena have been handed over for £ 46,000 each, which will help fund the ambitious and locally controversial expansion to the nearby golf course.

Crowds were very small, especially the first week, at SW 19 due to Covid restrictions

Crowds were very small, especially the first week, at SW 19 due to Covid restrictions

From next year they can look forward to making even more money, as the tournament will run for 14 consecutive days with the traditional Sunday rest being eradicated.

When canceled for 2020, the monetary coup was neutralized by a far-sighted insurance policy, although that has been impossible to guarantee this year.

Considering the drop in ticket sales and the additional Covid-related costs associated with the 2021 edition – like booking a central London hotel in bulk – £ 44million is a good result, although below the £ 50.8million announced in 2019.

The Lawn Tennis Association will receive the vast majority of the surplus.

The British game is already eagerly awaiting a £ 30million bonus from the government, which is awarding the money to repair public courts across the country following Emma Raducanu’s triumph at the US Open.

Another sign of Wimbledon’s seemingly pandemic and recession-proof finances is that the recent No.1 court bond sale has been oversubscribed.

A further 1,250 five-year arena season tickets have been sold for £ 46,000 each, which will help fund the ambitious and locally controversial expansion of the nearby golf course.

From next year they can look forward to making even more money, as the tournament will run for 14 consecutive days with the traditional Sunday rest being eradicated.

President Ian Hewitt also reported that with strict Covid controls for authorized spectators, the infection incidents associated with the 2021 Championships were statistically lower than in the wider community.

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